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. [applause] be mac thank you. there's a little less than two months before the election and in many ways this is the time the book was designed for because this are into these last two months, this is the election really get going. and to me, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove and he's in behind the scenes the whole time and he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. read new york here are not going to see much spent in the battleground states. and he's become king of the sub two. he has cover when you put this together money with money romney has raised the republican national committee is a total of about $1.8 billion. to put that in this, in no way, mccain had 375 million to spend, so this is a fact or a five. you'll start seeing it come out now. the other thing i want to discuss about him, is susie really? what does he do? is a political operative. how does he operate? what does he do? i talked to a couple services. one said there is a dark and terrible beauty about what he does. i have a
before on the 2004 race. i think i have one president, election in me. if we start a family, i would like to get one manufacture more presidential. she was okay with nap i had two candidates i liked. i asked to around people they didn't see al gore getting in. the other was john edwards. i liked john edwards at the time. and that didn't go -- there was a little bit of back and forth going on with that. and that didn't seem to be developing. so didn't look like anything was going to happen. there was one other candidates i liked. it was president obama. four years and a half years ago people back in the fall of 2006 would say things like, he's never going get elected there's no way america would elect a prime african-american you can't get elected with the name barack obama. it's actually didn't matter. i didn't know anybody in chicago. i didn't know anybody around the candidate. so it didn't look like anything was going to be happening. december 26, december 26, 2006 my wife and i were shopping day after christmas we were shopping in a borns and noble just up the road in california. my ph
. the first thing is we were in the middle of an election campaign, and candidate bill clinton was comparing beijing to baghdad. and this was right at the time when china was moving from baghdad to paris. maybe i'm overstating the case a little bit, but that's essentially what was happening. i mean, this was a dramatic shift in china, and the u.s. government paid absolutely no attention to it. it had no impact on the policies of the clinton administration when it took office. and, of course, since i was the american ambassador to china this confronted me with problems with an american government that had one view of china, that china was already moving in a different direction, and that created some contradictions in trying to carry out my instructions faithfully. but i think this time, you have something that goes of that. clearly are the bush eli a fair has exposed that china's political system is not different from others. leaders struggle for power. they have their own ambitions. some succeed, some come crashing down, as in the case of bush eli. so we shouldn't assume that just because c
come back and you know, fred's points are well taken which is for a lot of voters, the election started last night. if he is going to have a come back in ohio, it started last night. >> and fred and then we are going to open it up for the rest of you folks -- president obama one last time and beat senator mccain by seven points. now, part of it was you know, 66% of the vote among 18 to 29-year-olds, 67% of the vote among latino voters. african-american was like 95-4 or something like that and the poll has shown the african-american vote is rocksolid for the president and the numbers extremely high so lets let's just sort of assume rough parity with last time. but the question was, as you suggested the turnout levels among latino voters and i would add young voters very much questionable and when i have gone on campuses i cannot find a pulse. you saw a registration table registered to voters. there might be a couple of people behind the table to register people and nobody in front of the table registering. there's there is just no pulse there. is it safe to say that a seven-point
will have, and, in fact, i welcome. a this is, we're told, the most i important election in our lifetimes, and it may be that more people believe that this year than believed it in 2008, o 2004, and 2000 or other 2 elections when00 that is regulay said. e for this to be true, though, among other things, elections must, in fact, be desicive with gene knew win consequences for the making of public policy, d particularly, with regard to domestic policy. we could have a separate conversation about the issue of presidential power with regardea to foreign policy military policy, but let me say myto primary interest in the book ant in remarks this evening is much more domestic policy and the extent to which elections do ore do not bring us close to resolving important issues of domestic policy.es for the older members in this audience, there has been at t least one election that did fundamentally change america, and that is 1964, a mere 48 years ago when all of the stars were aligned, not only to create a landslide victory for johnson, after, all, richard nixon got a victory in 1972, but a lands
romney had in mind when he wanted to say states have rights. what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and help do they own? when you say government interference, i understand you were talking about the federal government, but i heard mitt romney say that states' rights, is it the rights of the state's coming into the cities to overthrow the local municipalities? if that's a big government, small government, i don't know, is it controlled government? i think they have a right to control their own destiny in their own city. so the public is on the ballot in november, and i am turning everybody in michigan to vote down. we don't need dictatorship. it is a dictated view. >> host: thanks so much on the mall of the government in relation to the city and its relationship with federal government. and detroit. swb writes the government should do its job and maintain the general welfare. from debate news the numbers are in on how many people watched on television. more than 600 million watched the debate in this election cycle nearly 15 million were going to watch t
you will have, in fact, that i welcome. this is, we're told, the most important election in our lifetimes, and it may be that more people believe that this year than believed it in 2008, 2004 and 2000 or other elections when that is regularly said. for this to be true, though, among other things elections must, in fact, be decisive, with genuine consequences for the making of public policy particularly with regard to domestic policy. um, we could have a separate conversation about the issue of presidential power with regard to foreign policy, military policy. but let me say that my primary interest in the book and in my remarks this evening is much more domestic policy, and can the extent to which elections do or do not bring us close to resolving important issues of domestic public policy. for the older members in this audience, there has been at least one election that did fundamentally change america, and that is 1964, a mere 48 years ago. when all of the stars were aligned not only to create a landslide victory for president lyndon johnson -- after all, richard nixon got a l
for the president's re-election effort is simply one word, forward. but not everyone thought it was catchy enough. so the vice president has apparently been floating some alternatives. >> age change only comes through challenge. i'm more optimistic about this country than i ever have been. not because of baraken. he can't do it. forget about your [bleep]. forget about all of it. so why the hell don't you go home. i don't quite get this. i'm so ashamed. [laughter] >> vice president biden was fired up at the naacp speech today. his second stem winder in a week. obama supporters praised those speeches. now it appears one show uncovered a new tour biden's starting. >> this summer, don't miss your chance to see america's funniest number two. joe biden, vp of comedy. >> those walls are often thin. i wonder how the hell my parents did it. that is different story. >> every laugh. >> barak says, three-letter word, j, o, b, s, jobs. >> every gaffe. >> god rest her soul and, although she is, your mom is still alive. it was your dad passed. god bless her soul. >> the joe biden vp of comedy tour. it will have
foundation. we are in for a real treat. here we are approaching election. which pretended to be a water shed, recognized by both political parties as turning point. a change debate about the role of government, free market to the future trajectory of our nation. in that debate, campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bytes, daily reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the miss -- mist of this a serious thinker wrote a serious book. having been discovered by william f. buckley and grown up writing and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opi
terms rather than putting faith in an elected official and crossing our fingers and hoping to do what we want. specifically for a contemporary example, the students into bed or on strikes for months because there was a proposed tuition hike that they said was completely unacceptable. it tried to make practice illegal. what has come of this? the tuition hike did not go through and the law forbidding process was repealed. i think -- >> would you please ask a specific question. >> i know. my question, i suppose, would be what do you see is the value of social movements for political change. >> thank you. >> thank you very much for that example. i think hopefully folks realize that actually the reason i was asked to testify before rumors of congress was because of my work on such a social movement. there were students on our campus who organized collectively to address this concern with our insurance and who saw that georgetown was providing an subsidizing contraception on insurance for their employees but not for students, even as students were paying entirely for their own insurance. and s
or became. um, the big issue, the big change began in 1980, of course, with the election of ronald reagan because ronald reagan brought with him to washington, um, a very underrated figure in recent american history, someone who i don't think gets his due as an important person, and that's edwin meese. because edwin meese at first as an adviser and then as attorney general said, look, there has been a liberal ayen da at the supreme court -- agenda at the supreme court, there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power, end racial preferences intended to assist african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation
to the scene in phoenix in 1960's during the election when william rehnquist was interviewing with voters and brosnahan said look -- he was a very well-known and respected lawyer by thin in san francisco and brosnahan said i was there and i was the fbi agent on the scene. i positively identify him as the man. discouraging black voters. rehnquist was giving them a literacy test and which was not illegal but it was, but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and the fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said, that was not made. >> host: kind of a case of mistaken identity so james brosnahan comes to washington and puts a lot on the line. >> guest: puts a lot on the line and really just kind it gets hammered because in the end he is not left with anything that really he can grab onto to come back at rehnquist. rehnquist simply says i just can't explain it. it's just not me and that was very i thought, very typical i think of when i met with rehnquist's 10 years later. very very typical of the way that he carried a question that he did not want to a
in the 1960s during the election when william rehnquist was interfering with voters. and brosnahan said, look, he was a very well known and respected lawyer by then in san francisco. and buzz han said, i was there, i was the fbi agent on the -- >> host: who was discouraging black voters. >> guest: rehnquist was giving them a literacy test. >> host: right. >> guest: and, um, which was not illegal, but it was -- but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and the fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said, that not me. >> host: kind of a mistaken identity. >> guest: case of mistaken identity. >> host: so james brosnahan comes to washington, puts a lot on the line -- >> guest: puts a lot on the line and really gets hammered because in the end he's not left with anything that really he can grab onto to come back at rehnquist. rehnquist simply says i just can't explain it, t just not me -- it's just not me. and that was very, very, i thought, cagey. it was very typical, i thought, when i met with rehnquist ten years later, um, very, very typical of the wa
excited.' i was up there one time when they were having a national election that was practically a revolution. they threw out the party that was in power. they co--completely took off a party that had been there forever, practically disappeared. a whole new set of folks came in, and all the commentators were there on election night saying, 'now let's not get excited.' when they win the world series, instead of cutting up and going wild and people downtown honking and dancing the way they would in america, instead the canadians always go, 'this is quite wonderful, but let's not get excited.' c-span: later in that column you said, 'we're the country that put elvis on a stamp'--you--by the way, did you... >> guest: very proud of... c-span: ...did like elvis presley? >> guest: well, of course. c-span: 'we buy pink lemonade and striped toothpaste.' now i didn't think one of our favorite people would get it into this book, but here he is: '67. 2 percent of us believe that alexis de tocqueville never should have divorced blake carrington.' >> guest: what a great nation. what a great nat
contacts. this is a fun time, so the other up until election day. >> host: we look forward to learning more about it when the campaign is over. thank you. >> guest: thank you. >> that was "after words," booktv signature program in which authors are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on sunday at 12:00 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click done "after words" and the topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> the next three hours is your turn to tap with author and lecturer's even johnson, the best-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> gu
be governed through the most austere totalitarian means and once that collapsed the we have an elected government in tripoli it cannot project power beyond greater tripoli. you have a problem of governmental incapacity in libya that cannot deal with the crisis. egypt is different. egypt you have a country that has been an age old cluster of civilization for years. a cohesive community along the nile aware the government has greater bureaucratic and institutional power even under this new tenuis regime than the government in libya. the government in egypt has an army and police forces but the problem is political. can an islamic government take action against islamic them craters demonstrators. >> to take the other issue you are talking about this week, iran is a big theme in your book. you talk in one chapter about the iranian pet. the prime minister of israel sees iran very much in terms of the munich analogy. iran heading for having nuclear weapons capability that could threaten the existence of israel so the policy conclusions from that, you have a broader geographical and historica
airplane you're more likely to be elected president of the united states than you are to die in a commercial airplane crash. the example i give kind of the set piece in the book is story of the miracle on the hudson. reminding my way to the, so they have right context. when the us air flight landed in the hudson and everyone survived i thought it was very telling how the media chose to cover this event. there are really two different ways they covered it. first was superhero pilot, captain sully who indeed was an amazing pilot and amazing job. there was this kind of language of the miracle on the hudson. almost like supernatural event that happened. when people didn't focus on nearly enough was the plane, the plane had, performed admirably during this, during this event and, it did so on a couple of levels. one when the geese collided with the jet engines they didn't explode, they didn't shatter, they didn't send of shard. is of titanium in the fuselage causing the plain to break down. that is because every single jet engine, every single model of a jet engine on aircraft is
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17